small beginnings

Small Beginnings

Take me to Barnes & Noble and beyond a shadow of a doubt you can guarantee that within seconds I’ll be in my favorite section: The Self -Help section. That’s right. Don’t ask me why, my only guess is that it’s due to the fact that my degree is a Bachelor of Arts in Psychology. My last trip to B&N I stumbled upon a book full of wisdom. I read that successful people write down their accomplishments and put them where they can see them.

My thought: Brilliant.

Naturally, I decided that I too must write down my accomplishments.

Weeks ago I had bought a huge piece of plywood with no rhyme or reason for it. Luckily for the plywood it finally found purpose: It’d be my board of accomplishments. A couple of coats of chalk paint later and it was transformed into a blank canvas waiting to hold the things that I was proud of.

As I started sifting through my memories trying to think of my accomplishments throughout life I realized why people who write down their accomplishments are successful. They are motivated by the fact that they have already have accomplishments on their record to be proud of, knowing that there is still a whole life in front of them waiting for them to accomplish things far greater than what they’ve already done.

On the verge of turning twenty-five I have a whole to do list for my life of things that I want to accomplish. I’ll be honest, some days it’s a little overwhelming and the thought crosses through my head “Am I really ever going do this?”

I mean my list has some pretty big things on it including:
Start a magazine.
Own a coffee shop.
Write a book (or two).
Throw a benefit concert in the middle of Central Park.
Host a national conference.
Start a non-profit that rescues women out of sex trafficking.

The list continues.

After filling my blank canvas with some of my accomplishments, I suddenly felt empowered. I’ve lived a quarter of life and I have quite a few things I can say I’m proud of.

I’ve learned to play the piano. I got my real estate license. I threw my first benefit concert in college and raised $500 for the She Rescue Home. I learned Photoshop. I planned Orphan for a Night a nation wide event that raised thousands of dollars for orphan projects. I’ve graduated from college with a Bachelor of Arts in Psychology. The list goes on.

My mother always says, “The best is yet to come.” So, with that said, the things on our list of accomplishments is only the beginning. The best is still on its ways because we are constantly growing and changing. As we get older: we obtain more wisdom, add and sharpen our skill sets, fail a time or two and learn from our mistakes, overcome obstacles and gain strength, and gain experience.

Whoever you are: you’re human. [Genius statement: I know.] Which means this: You have dreams, goals, and visions. And if you are normal, you have a desire to be successful.

So let me break down my new theory for you:
Instead of getting overwhelmed by the vagueness of the future, find confidence in the fact that you’ve already accomplished great things [whether big or small].

Life, take it one day at time, one step at a time. You still have your whole life a head of you to cross things off your life to do list.

My dad always tells me: “Lindsey, don’t despise small beginnings.” Small beginnings is how we get to greatness.

I leave you with this: Take time to recognize your accomplishments. Write them down. Be motivated and encourage by what you’ve done, knowing that those accomplishments are the ones that are going to propel you to do bigger and greater things in the future.

Believe in yourself. Remember your accomplishments. [And] Dream on.

Be confident in this: That he who began a good work in you will carry it on to the completion. [Philippians 1.6]

Be Inspired + Create